Iowa Flood Central

Iowans' resource for flood information.

This blog is maintained and updated by the Iowa Governor's Office and Iowa HSEMD staff.
Recent Tweets @iowahsemd

Joseph M. Folsom, the U. S. Small Business Administration’s (SBA) Iowa District Director, announced today that SBA will close its Disaster Loan Outreach Centers in Rock Rapids and Rock Valley on Thursday, July 31 at 5 pm. 

“SBA opened the centers to provide personalized assistance to Iowa residents and business owners affected by the severe storms, flooding, straight-line winds and tornadoes that occurred June 14 ‑ 23, 2014, in Lyon and Sioux counties,” said Folsom.

“Until the centers close, SBA customer service representatives will continue to be available to meet with residents and business owners to answer their questions, explain SBA’s disaster loan program, help them complete their applications and close their approved disaster loans,” Folsom continued. 

Residents and business owners can meet with SBA representatives on the days and times indicated below.  No appointment is necessary.

LYON COUNTY

Disaster Loan Outreach Center

114 First Avenue

(corner of First Avenue and Marshall Street)

Rock Rapids, IA  51246

Monday – Friday, 8:30 am – 5 pm

Closes Thursday, July 31 at 5 pm

SIOUX COUNTY

Disaster Loan Outreach Center

Faith Reformed Church

(lower level, southwest entrance, Room 5)

1305 7th Street

Rock Valley, IA  51247

Monday – Friday, 8:30 am – 5 pm

Closes Thursday, July 31 at 5 pm

Disaster loans up to $200,000 are available to homeowners to repair or replace damaged or destroyed real estate.  Homeowners and renters are eligible for up to $40,000 to repair or replace damaged or destroyed personal property.

Businesses of any size and private, nonprofit organizations may borrow up to $2 million to repair or replace damaged or destroyed real estate, machinery and equipment, inventory, and other business assets.  SBA can also lend additional funds to homeowners and businesses to help with the cost of making improvements that protect, prevent or minimize the same type of disaster damage from occurring in the future.

For small businesses and most private, nonprofit organizations of any size, SBA offers Economic Injury Disaster Loans (EIDLs) to help meet working capital needs caused by the disaster.  EIDL assistance is available regardless of whether the business suffered any property damage.

Interest rates can be as low as 2.188 percent for homeowners and renters, 2.625 percent for private, nonprofit organizations and 4 percent for businesses, with terms up to 30 years.  Loan amounts and terms are set by SBA and are based upon each applicant’s financial condition.

Applicants may apply online using the Electronic Loan Application (ELA) via SBA’s secure Web site at https://disasterloan.sba.gov/ela

Disaster loan information and application forms are also available from SBA’s Customer Service Center by calling (800) 659-2955 or e-mailing disastercustomerservice@sba.gov.  Individuals who are deaf or hard‑of‑hearing may call (800) 877-8339.  For more information about SBA’s disaster assistance programs, visit http://www.sba.gov/disaster

The filing deadline to return applications for property damage is September 8, 2014.  The deadline to return economic injury applications is April 8, 2015

26 Iowa counties receive Presidential designation

(DES MOINES) - Governor Terry E. Branstad received word today that President Barack Obama approved his request for a Presidential Disaster Declaration for 26 counties impacted by severe weather in June.

The counties included in the declaration are: Allamakee, Buchanan, Buena Vista, Butler, Cherokee, Chickasaw, Clay, Dickinson, Emmet, Fayette, Franklin, Hancock, Humboldt, Ida, Kossuth, Lyon, Osceola, Palo Alto, Plymouth, Pocahontas, Sac, Sioux, Winnebago, Winneshiek, Woodbury, and Wright.

As the Iowa Homeland Security and Emergency Management Department continues to assess damage in other counties affected by severe weather, Branstad noted that additional requests for a Presidential Disaster Declaration may be sent at a later date.

The governor sent the request for a declaration on July 14, 2014, in response to significant damage that was caused by severe storms, damaging winds, tornadoes, heavy rain, hail and flooding that occurred June 14-23, 2014. This is Iowa’s second Presidential Disaster Declaration in 2014.

The declaration by the President will provide federal funding to the declared counties under the Public Assistance Program. A Presidential Major Disaster Declaration for Public Assistance puts into motion long-term federal recovery programs, some of which are matched by state programs, and designed to help public entities and select non-profits. Public Assistance funds may be used for emergency work and the repair or replacement of disaster-damaged facilities and may include debris removal, emergency protective measures, repair of damaged public property, loans needed by communities for essential government functions and grants for public schools.

The Governor also received notification that the Presidential Disaster Declaration includes funding to conduct hazard mitigation activities for the entire state. With this funding, Iowa will be able to minimize the impact of future disasters by taking steps now to strengthen existing infrastructure.

This Presidential Disaster Declaration is the 20th Major Presidential Disaster Declaration Iowa has received since March 2007.

Today, Governor Terry E. Branstad issued a proclamation of disaster emergency for Louisa County. This is in response to the flooding and severe weather that began June 26, 2014.


The governor’s proclamation activates the Iowa Individual Assistance Program.


The Iowa Individual Assistance Program provides grants of up to $5,000 for households with incomes up to 200 percent of the federal poverty level, or a maximum annual income of $39,580, for a family of three. Grants are available for home or car repairs, replacement of clothing or food, and for the expense of temporary housing. Original receipts are required for those seeking reimbursement for actual expenses related to storm recovery. The grant application and instructions are available on the Iowa Department of Human Services website. Potential applicants have 45 days from the date of the proclamation to submit a claim.

Release Date:  July 21, 2014

Media Contact:  Richard Jenkins

Release Number:  IA 13849-02

Phone:  (916) 735-1500

Iowa Small Businesses Have Three Weeks Left

to Apply for SBA Disaster Loans

SACRAMENTO, Calif. – The U. S. Small Business Administration (SBA) today reminded small, nonfarm businesses in 70 Iowa counties and neighboring counties in Illinois and Missouri that they have until August 11, 2014, to apply for an Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL).  These loans are to offset economic losses because of reduced revenues to farmers and ranchers caused by drought that occurred from August 27 - October 28, 2013, in the following primary counties, announced Tanya N. Garfield, Director of SBA’s Disaster Field Operations Center - West.

Primary Iowa counties:  Adair, Audubon, Boone, Buena Vista, Calhoun, Carroll, Clarke, Crawford, Dallas, Des Moines, Greene, Guthrie, Hamilton, Hardin, Henry, Ida, Iowa, Jasper, Jefferson, Johnson, Keokuk, Lee, Louisa, Lucas, Madison, Mahaska, Marion, Marshall, Monroe, Muscatine, Pocahontas, Polk, Poweshiek, Sac, Shelby, Story, Tama, Union, Wapello, Warren, Washington and Webster; 

Neighboring Iowa counties:  Adams, Appanoose, Benton, Black Hawk, Butler, Cass, Cedar, Cherokee, Clay, Davis, Decatur, Franklin, Grundy, Harrison, Humboldt, Kossuth, Linn, Monona, O’Brien, Palo Alto, Pottawattamie, Ringgold, Scott, Taylor, Van Buren, Wayne, Woodbury and Wright; 

Neighboring Illinois counties:  Hancock, Henderson, Mercer and Rock Island;

Neighboring Missouri county:  Clark.

“SBA eligibility covers both the economic impacts on businesses dependent on farmers and ranchers that have suffered agricultural production losses caused by the disaster and businesses directly impacted by the disaster,” Garfield said.

Small, nonfarm businesses, small agricultural cooperatives, small businesses engaged in aquaculture and most private, nonprofit organizations of any size may qualify for Economic Injury Disaster Loans (EIDLs) of up to $2 million to help meet financial obligations and operating expenses which could have been met had the disaster not occurred.

“Eligibility for these loans is based on the financial impact of the disaster only and not on any actual property damage.  These loans have an interest rate of 4% for businesses and 2.875% for private, nonprofit organizations, a maximum term of 30 years, and are available to small businesses and most private, nonprofits without the financial ability to offset the adverse impact without hardship,” Garfield said.

Businesses primarily engaged in farming or ranching are not eligible for SBA disaster assistance.  Agricultural enterprises should contact the Farm Services Agency (FSA) about the U. S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) assistance made available by the Secretary’s declaration.  However, in drought disasters nurseries are eligible for SBA disaster assistance.

Applicants may apply online using the Electronic Loan Application (ELA) via SBA’s secure Web site at https://disasterloan.sba.gov/ela.

For owners of these impacted small businesses, disaster loan information and application forms are also available from SBA’s Customer Service Center by calling toll-free at (800) 659-2955 or e-mailing disastercustomerservice@sba.gov. Individuals who are deaf or hard‑of‑hearing may call (800) 877-8339. For more information about SBA’s disaster assistance programs, visit http://www.sba.gov/disaster.

The deadline to apply for these loans is August 11, 2014.

Updated map of counties declared disaster areas by Gov. Branstad

Governor Terry E. Branstad received word today that President Obama approved his request for a Presidential Disaster Declaration for nine counties impacted by severe weather in June.

The counties included in the declaration are: Adams, Clarke, Decatur, Mills, Montgomery, Pottawattamie, Ringgold, Taylor and Wayne.

The governor sent the request for a declaration on July 7 in response to significant damage that was caused by severe storms, tornadoes, straight-line winds, and flooding that occurred June 3-4. This is Iowa’s first Presidential Disaster Declaration in 2014.

The declaration by the President will provide federal funding to the declared counties under the Public Assistance Program. A Presidential Major Disaster Declaration for Public Assistance puts into motion long-term federal recovery programs, some of which are matched by state programs, and designed to help public entities and select non-profits. Public Assistance funds may be used for emergency work and the repair or replacement of disaster-damaged facilities and may include debris removal, emergency protective measures, repair of damaged public property, loans needed by communities for essential government functions and grants for public schools.

The Governor also received notification that the Presidential Disaster Declaration includes funding to conduct hazard mitigation activities for the entire state. With this funding, Iowa will be able to minimize the impact of future disasters by taking steps now to strengthen existing infrastructure.

This Presidential Disaster Declaration is the 19th Major Presidential Disaster Declaration Iowa has received since March 2007.

New Presidential Disaster Declaration request for 26 counties

Also today, Governor Branstad signed a letter to be delivered to President Obama requesting a second Presidential Disaster Declaration for Iowa as a result of severe storms, damaging winds, tornadoes, heavy rain, hail and flooding that occurred June 14-23.

The 26 counties in the request are: Allamakee, Buchanan, Buena Vista, Butler, Cherokee, Chickasaw, Clay, Dickinson, Emmet, Fayette, Franklin, Hancock, Humboldt, Ida, Kossuth, Lyon, Osceola, Palo Alto, Plymouth, Pocahontas, Sac, Sioux, Winnebago, Winneshiek, Woodbury, and Wright.

Iowa HSEMD requests additional damage assessments for four counties

In addition, the Iowa Homeland Security and Emergency Management Department (HSEMD) sent a request today to FEMA requesting damage assessments in four counties as a result of severe weather and flooding that occurred June 26 and continuing. The damage assessments, which will primarily cover public infrastructure, will be conducted jointly with HSEMD and other state officials as well as local and federal partners. Results of the damage assessments could be used to determine if a request for a Presidential Disaster Declaration is warranted. Damage assessments will be conducted in the following counties: Benton, Keokuk, Tama and Washington.

Governor Branstad issues Disaster Proclamation for Chickasaw County

Governor Branstad today issued a disaster proclamation for Chickasaw County as a result of severe storms that occurred beginning June 26. The governor’s proclamation allows State resources to be utilized to respond to and recover from the effects of these storms.

In addition, today’s proclamation activates the Iowa Individual Assistance Program for Chickasaw County, as well as Benton and Des Moines counties, for which he had issued disaster proclamations on July 10 and July 2, respectively.

The Iowa Individual Assistance Program provides grants of up to $5,000 for households with incomes up to 200 percent of the federal poverty level, or a maximum annual income of $39,580, for a family of three. Grants are available for home or car repairs, replacement of clothing or food, and for the expense of temporary housing. Original receipts are required for those seeking reimbursement for actual expenses related to storm recovery. The grant application and instructions are available on the Iowa Department of Human Services website. Potential applicants have 45 days from the date of the proclamation to submit a claim.

Low-interest federal disaster loans available to residents and business owners; Available in primary counties of Lyon and Sioux, and neighboring counties of Cherokee, O’Brien, Osceola and Plymouth

(DES MOINES) – Following Gov. Terry E. Branstad’s request, the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) announced that low-interest federal disaster loans are available to Iowa residents and business owners affected by severe weather events that occurred from June 14-23, 2014. The U.S. Small Business Administration acted after receiving the request from Branstad on July 7, 2014.

The SBA assistance is available for residents in the primary Iowa counties of Lyon and Sioux, and the neighboring Iowa counties of Cherokee, O’Brien, Osceola and Plymouth.

Individuals and businesses interested in the SBA disaster loan program may visit the following offices beginning at 10 a.m. on Tuesday, July 15, 2014, to get more information:


Lyon County

Disaster Loan Outreach Center

114 First Avenue

Rock Rapids, Iowa

Hours: Monday-Friday 8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Sioux County

Disaster Loan Outreach Center

Faith Reformed Church

1305 7th Street

Rock Valley, Iowa

Hours: Monday-Friday 8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m.

 

Disaster loans are available to homeowners to repair or replace damaged or destroyed real estate. Homeowners and renters are eligible for up to $40,000 to repair or replace damaged or destroyed personal property.

Businesses of any size and private, nonprofit organizations may borrow up to $2 million to repair or replace damaged or destroyed real estate, machinery, equipment, inventory, and other business assets.

Interest rates can be as low as 2.188 percent for homeowners and renters, 2.625 percent for private, nonprofit organizations and 4 percent for businesses, with terms up to 30 years. Loan amounts and terms are set by SBA and are based on each applicant’s financial condition.

Applicants may apply online at https://disasterloan.sba.gov/ela. Disaster loan information and application forms are also available from the SBA’s Customer Service Center by calling 1-800-659-2955 or by emailing disastercustomerservice@sba.gov. Individuals who are deaf or hearing of hearing may call 1-800-877-8339.

The filing deadline to return applications for property damage is September 8, 2014.

Information in this release was provided by SBA press release. Find more information and view the release in its entirety here.

###

MAP: Iowa counties under governor’s disaster proclamation - Updated July 10, 2014.

Today, Gov. Terry E. Branstad issued a proclamation of disaster emergency for Benton, Butler, Mahaska and Tama counties. This is in response to the ongoing flooding and severe weather beginning June 26, 2014.

 
The governor’s proclamation allows State resources to be utilized to respond to and recover from the effects of these storms.


In addition, today’s proclamation activates the Iowa Individual Assistance Program for Tama County.


The Iowa Individual Assistance Program provides grants of up to $5,000 for households with incomes up to 200 percent of the federal poverty level, or a maximum annual income of $39,580, for a family of three. Grants are available for home or car repairs, replacement of clothing or food, and for the expense of temporary housing. Original receipts are required for those seeking reimbursement for actual expenses related to storm recovery. The grant application and instructions are available on the Iowa Department of Human Services website. Potential applicants have 45 days from the date of the proclamation to submit a claim.

Updated map of Iowa counties declared disaster areas by Gov. Branstad. Updated on July 9, 2014.

Issues disaster proclamation for seven counties, temporarily suspends certain transportation weight restrictions, asks FEMA to conduct damage assessment

(DES MOINES)  - Today, Gov. Terry E. Branstad issued a proclamation of disaster emergency for seven counties in response to the ongoing flooding and severe weather beginning June 26, 2014, temporarily lifted certain transportation weight restrictions and requested the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) to conduct assessments in 20 counties impacted by the June 26 and continuing storms.

The counties included in today’s disaster proclamation are Audubon, Grundy, Ida, Jasper, Keokuk, Poweshiek and Washington. The governor’s proclamation allows State resources to be utilized to respond to and recover from the effects of these storms.

Also today, Gov. Branstad issued a proclamation of disaster emergency to temporarily suspend Iowa Department of Transportation weight restrictions in Plymouth and Sioux counties.

The proclamation will temporarily lift certain transportation restrictions on the movement of loads related to the repair of damage sustained to the railroad operated by D & I Railroad and owned by the State of South Dakota. The damage was caused by the June 14, 2014, and continuing severe storms. The suspension of weight provisions applies to loads transported on Iowa Highway 3, Iowa Highway 10 and Iowa Highway 12 in Plymouth and Sioux counties and excludes other Iowa roadways and interstate systems. D & I Railroad provides shipping service to multiple area companies, including agriculture and ethanol producers.

In addition, the Iowa Department of Homeland Security and Emergency Management (HSEMD) made a request today to FEMA to conduct damage assessments in 20 counties impacted by the June 26 and continuing storms. The damage assessments, which will primarily cover public infrastructure, will be conducted jointly by FEMA, HSEMD and local officials. Results of the damage assessments could be used to determine if a request for a Presidential Disaster Declaration is warranted. Damage assessments will be conducted in the following counties: Audubon, Black Hawk, Butler, Cedar, Des Moines, Grundy, Hamilton, Hardin, Ida, Iowa, Jackson, Jasper, Johnson, Jones, Lee, Linn, Louisa, Mahaska, Muscatine and Poweshiek.

This is the fourth such request that HSEMD has made to FEMA to conduct damage assessments as a result of June severe weather.

UPDATE: Map of Iowa counties declared disaster areas by Gov. Branstad as of July 8, 2014.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Tuesday, July 8, 2014
Contact: Iowa HSEMD, 515-725-3231

Governor’s office 515-281-5211

Gov. Branstad issues disaster proclamations for three counties

(DES MOINES) – Today, Gov. Terry E. Branstad issued a proclamation of disaster emergency for Polk County in addition to a proclamation of disaster emergency issued yesterday for Scott and Shelby counties.  This is in response to the ongoing flooding and severe weather beginning June 26, 2014. 

The governor’s proclamations allow State resources to be utilized to respond to and recover from the effects of these storms.

In addition, yesterday’s proclamation activates the Iowa Individual Assistance Program for Scott and Shelby counties.

The Iowa Individual Assistance Program provides grants of up to $5,000 for households with incomes up to 200 percent of the federal poverty level, or a maximum annual income of $39,580, for a family of three. Grants are available for home or car repairs, replacement of clothing or food, and for the expense of temporary housing. Original receipts are required for those seeking reimbursement for actual expenses related to storm recovery. The grant application and instructions are available on the Iowa Department of Human Services website. Potential applicants have 45 days from the date of the proclamation to submit a claim.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Monday, July 7, 2014
Contact: Iowa HSEMD, 515-725-3231
Governor’s Office, 515-281-5211

Gov. Branstad requests Presidential Disaster Declaration from President Obama

Request made for Adams, Clarke, Decatur, Mills, Montgomery, Pottawattamie, Ringgold, Taylor, and Wayne counties following June 3rd storms

(DES MOINES)  – Gov. Terry E. Branstad today signed a letter to be delivered to President Obama requesting a Presidential Disaster Declaration for nine Iowa counties where significant damage was sustained from damaging winds, hail, heavy rains and thunderstorms from June 3, 2014 – June 4, 2014. This request pertains to damages from the June 3 – 4 severe weather event and it is possible more requests will be made for additional counties adversely affected by subsequent severe weather.  In some areas of the State, flood waters have not yet fully subsided and full county-level damage assessments are still underway from recent severe weather.

Regarding the June 3 – 4 severe weather event, the letter reads, in part, “In response to the situation, I have issued a total of three State of Iowa Proclamations of Disaster Emergency.  The first was issued on June 3, 2014, directing the execution of the Iowa Emergency Response Plan in Pottawattamie County.  Succeeding proclamations have resulted in a total of 11 counties to be in a State of Disaster Emergency. These actions were taken pursuant to Iowa Code § 29C.6 and Section 401 of the Stafford Act.

“I determined that the severity of the damage in Adams, Clarke, Decatur, Harrison, Mills, Montgomery, Pottawattamie, Ringgold, Taylor, and Wayne Counties is so great that Joint Federal, State, and local Public Assistance Preliminary Damage Assessments were required. On June 12, 2014, the State of Iowa first requested a Joint Federal, State, and local Public Assistance Preliminary Damage Assessment for ten of the most severely impacted counties.  These assessments commenced on June 18, and were concluded on June 21.

“As a result of these Joint assessments, I have determined that the severity of damages in nine counties is such that Federal Assistance is needed.”

The full letter to President Barack Obama can be read here, or below:

July 7, 2014

The Honorable Barack Obama

President of the United States

The White House

1600 Pennsylvania Ave. NW

Washington, DC 20500

Through: Regional Administrator Beth Freeman

FEMA Region VII

9221 Ward Parkway, Suite 300

Kansas City, MO 64114

Dear Mr. President:

Under the provisions of Section 401 of the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act, 42 U.S.C. § 5121-5207 (Stafford Act), as implemented by 44 CFR § 206.36, I request that you declare a major disaster for the State of Iowa as a result of severe weather that produced damaging winds, tornados, heavy rains, hail, and thunderstorms resulting in severe damages and flooding beginning on June 3, 2014 through June 4, 2014, causing significant damages to public infrastructure and private property.

GENERAL FACTS OF THIS DISASTER.        

During the morning of June 3, 2014, National Weather Service (NWS) Storm Prediction Center indicated that intense storms were developing along a surface warm front near the border between Nebraska and South Dakota.  These storms then continued east throughout June 3, gaining strength from moisture fluxes in response to large scale ascent and thermodynamic processes (diabatic processes).  These storms reinforced existing low level atmospheric instability in their path.  This created an ideal environment for the creation of super cells with intense rain, large hail, high winds, and the formation of tornados.

Once in Iowa during the late afternoon and evening hours of June 3, the storms produced straight-line winds in excess of 90 mph, hail in excess of two inches in diameter, rainfall exceeding 5.5 inches in some areas, and an EF2 tornado.

The NWS Weather Forecast Office in Omaha, Nebraska conducted a storm survey in Pottawattamie County, Iowa on June 4, confirming an EF2 with estimated peak winds of 115 mph occurred near the City of Oakland.  The tornado traveled for 2.9 miles, hitting a farm house, and destroyed a garage, barn, and farm sheds.

Straight-line winds estimated by the NWS at 94 mph destroyed farm outbuildings near the City of Lenox, Taylor County.  Wind gusts estimated by the NWS at 95 mph also destroyed farm outbuildings near the City of Diagonal, Ringgold County.  Additional straight-line winds estimated between 70 and 75 mph were also reported by the NWS in Taylor and Ringgold Counties.

Trained weather spotters reported hail in excess of two inches in diameter (just larger than a golf ball) was reported in four counties (Cass, Decatur, Ringgold, and Taylor counties).  This hail broke windows in buildings and vehicles, severely damaged building siding and roofs, and damaged crops.  Near the City of Mount Ayr in Ringgold County, hail estimated at 2.75 inches (roughly the size of a baseball), was reported to the NWS.

Record rainfall was reported in several locations throughout Iowa, including 5.56 inches received in the City of Lamoni, Decatur County and six inches in the Cass County Cities of Lewis and Griswold.

In response to the situation, I have issued a total of three State of Iowa Proclamations of Disaster Emergency.  The first was issued on June 3, 2014, directing the execution of the Iowa Emergency Response Plan in Pottawattamie County.  Succeeding proclamations have resulted in a total of 11 counties to be in a State of Disaster Emergency. These actions were taken pursuant to Iowa Code § 29C.6 and Section 401 of the Stafford Act.

I determined that the severity of the damage in Adams, Clarke, Decatur, Harrison, Mills, Montgomery, Pottawattamie, Ringgold, Taylor, and Wayne Counties is so great that Joint Federal, State, and local Public Assistance Preliminary Damage Assessments were required. On June 12, 2014, the State of Iowa first requested a Joint Federal, State, and local Public Assistance Preliminary Damage Assessment for ten of the most severely impacted Counties.  These assessments commenced on June 18, and were concluded on June 21.

As a result of these Joint assessments, I have determined that the severity of damages in nine Counties is such that Federal Assistance is needed.

Deaths, injuries, additional Damages.

The following is a continuation of the additional damages, impacts, and accessibility problems in the affected area and population described in sections 8 and 10 of the Request for Presidential Disaster (FEMA Form 010-0-13).  Although some of these damages may be covered by insurance, they contribute to the overall magnitude of the disaster.

                Fatalities, Injuries, and Evacuations.

  • Thirteen people were injured on Interstate 29 in Harrison County when the sudden onset of large hail broke windows in their vehicles causing lacerations.  Most were transported by ambulance to the Community Memorial Hospital in Missouri Valley, Harrison County for treatment, and were later released.

Critical Facilities and Infrastructure.

  • The Adams County Public Service Answering Point, the facility that handles 911 calls, reported a power loss at 6:45 pm on June 3rd.  Emergency calls were re-routed to surrounding counties until power was restored six hours later.
  • The Emergency Operations Center in Adams County utilized a backup power generator for approximately ten hours until power was restored to the facility.
  • Minor flooding was reported in the surgical suite inside Mercy Hospital in the City of Corning, Adams County.
  • Pumps at the wastewater treatment plant near the City of Clarinda, Page County, went offline after losing power during the storm.  The backup generator malfunctioned, causing the facility sewage to backup until electricity was restored.
  • While storm spotting, large hail damaged a fire truck used to respond to grass fires for the City of Corning, Adams County and a rescue truck in the City of Clearfield, Taylor County.
  • The Iowa State Patrol reported two patrol vehicles severely damaged by large hail while performing storm spotting and rescue operations in Interstate 29.

 

Agriculture.

  • Iowa is the national leader in corn, soybean, pork and egg production, and second nationally in red meat, net farm income, and overall agriculture exports.  In 2011, Iowa agriculture contributed $9.875 billion to Iowa’s economy, or about 6.6% of Iowa’s Gross Domestic Product.  With spring planting having just concluded in much of the state, young crops were severely damaged and destroyed by hail and heavy rains.

 

Commercial and Transportation.

  • Damages to many roads is extensive, with roadbeds washed away, road surface scouring from overtopping, aggregate washout, culvert collapses, and bridge damage.   These damages have rendered much of the affected roads impassable until repairs can be made.  These damages impacted the ability of emergency response in the area, agricultural operations including: care of young crops in fields, farm to market deliveries, and other commercial cargo from reaching its destination.
    • Adair County reported several roads in the southern portions of the county were closed as they were covered with water.
    • The City of Griswold, Cass County, reported that over 18 inches of water covered municipal roadways.
    • The Decatur County Engineer reported an estimated 25 culverts were damaged, 12 bridges damaged, and another 40 locations of roadway were overtopped.  This resulted in at least 20 road closures.
    • Several roads in Davis City, Decatur County, were flooded by two to three feet of water.
    • Montgomery County estimated 100 areas where water was over County roads.
    • The Pottawattamie County Engineer’s office activated all 62 of its employees to survey all of the County’s roadways.  They reported that over two million dollars in damages and related expenses were sustained as a result of heavy rains overtopping roadways, and high winds and hail damaging signs and causing vegetative debris to block roadways.
    • A 16-inch storm sewer at the intersection of Main Street and Kansas City Avenue in the City of Benton, Ringgold County, was unable to sustain the extreme flow of water, causing it to blowout, and the street intersection to collapse.
    • The Adams County Engineer reported that the center support structure for a bridge on 145th Street had been broken by debris and water.  The bridge remains closed.
    • Widespread street flooding occurred in the City of Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie County.
    • Trained storm spotters in Ringgold County reported that nearly two feet of water covered State Highway 25 near the City of Clearfield.
    • The City of Diagonal, Ringgold County, saw significant street flooding.
    • Street flooding in the City of Sharpsburg, Taylor County, and the threat of further flooding resulted in proactive actions by the City.
    • After receiving 3.39 inches of rain as a result of this storm, street flooding in the City of Lenox, Taylor County occurred.
    • Taylor County Highway P-14 was closed near the southwest Taylor County town of Blockton due to water having severely damaged a bridge.
    • The bridge approach on Popular Avenue in Adams County was washed out, closing the bridge until it can be repaired.
    • Over ten inches of water was reported to have covered roads near the City of Lineville, Wayne County.
    • Damages to Federal Aid Roadways are estimated to exceed $175,000 in seven counties.
    • Hail damaged an airport hangar housing roughly ten planes at the Corning Municipal Airport.
  • Large hail along Interstate 29 in Pottawattamie County broke out windows of vehicles, causing at least 12 vehicles to be abandoned by their occupants as they sought shelter.
  • High winds tore portions of the roof off of the Rath Inn in the City of Missouri Valley, Harrison County, resulting in damage to ten rooms.  The corner of the roof on the adjacent Super 8 Motel was also torn off.
  • The Iowa Department of Natural Resources (DNR) delayed the reopening of Wilson Island State Recreation Area in Pottawattamie County.  The park had been closed since flooding in 2011 (Presidential Disaster Declaration DR-1998). Damages from a reported four inches of rain, baseball sized hail, and 80-90 mph winds broke 11 broken, damaged siding and the metal roof of the main building at the park.  An estimated 30 mature cottonwood trees in the park were also uprooted by the storm.
  • Waubonsie State Park in Fremont County partially closed its modern campground due to a washout of a vital road leading into the campground.  Equestrian trails were also closed in the park due to heavy rainfall and wet conditions.

Residential.

  • One home was destroyed, and an additional 38 were damaged in rural Minden, Pottawattamie County, as a result of the EF2 tornado that passed through the area.
  • A home in the City of Corning, Adams County, was a total loss after it burned down following a lightning strike.
  • The American Red Cross (ARC) temporarily relocated a family in the City of Lewis, Cass County, after the roof on their home was lost.
  • A tree fell on a freshly filled propane tank at a home in Pottawattamie County.  The tree ruptured the tank, causing the area to be isolated until the propane gas had dissipated.
  • Eighty-nine homes in Pottawattamie County, 49 homes in Ringgold County, 17 homes in Harrison County, and numerous others in the affected counties received extensive siding and roof damage as a result of 70-90 mph wind gusts and hail.

 

Utilities and Telecommunication.

  • Extreme winds combined with large hail resulted in several electrical outages throughout the affected area.
    • Central Iowa Power Cooperative, an electrical generation and transmission provider had several poles broken.  This resulted in a loss of electrical service to Southwest Iowa Rural Electrical Cooperative, which serves 1,500 customers.  This includes customers in Adams, Decatur, Montgomery, Page, Ringgold, Taylor and Union Counties.  The outage lasted for about an hour.
    • MidAmerican Energy had over 2,800 customers without power.  Over 1,800 of those customers are located in Pottawattamie County.
    • Access Energy Cooperative reported having a peak of 207 customers without electrical service in Henry, Jefferson, and Van Buren Counties.
    • Alliant Energy reported 170 outages in Linn and Wapello Counties.

RESOURCES PROVIDED.

                The following describes the nature and amount of State and local resources that have been or will be used to alleviate conditions of this disaster as outlined in Section 9 of the Request for Presidential Disaster (FEMA Form 010-0-13).

  • Local Resources:
    • During the storm, most local jurisdictions performed storm spotting duties.
    • County Engineers offices throughout the affected area barricaded roads that had been washed out, overtopped, or otherwise impassable.
  • Non-Governmental Organization resources:
    • American Red Cross:
      • Provided temporary housing to a family who lost the roof of their home in Cass County.
      • Activated a hotline to assist citizens in identifying resources and organizations that may be of assistance.
  • State Resources:
    • Iowa HSEMD contributed numerous resources, including:
      • The State’s Saw Team was activated on June 3, and deployed to Pottawattamie County to assist in clearing emergency routes in urban and rural areas throughout the county.
      • Provided coordination of resources.
      • Iowa Department of Human Services (DHS)
        • Provided support and management of the Iowa Individual Assistance program.
        • Iowa Department of Public Safety (Iowa State Patrol)
          • Provided storm spotting and rescue services on Interstate 29.
          • Iowa Department of Natural Resources
            • Performed debris removal at Wilson Island State Recreational Area and Waubonsie State Park.
  • Federal Resources already committed:
    • The National Weather Service provided ongoing weather briefings and related information throughout the event.

                          

PUBLIC ASSISTANCE SUMMARY.

Flood waters and storms left much of the affected area with significant debris, such as vegetation, dirt and sand, and other debris (Category A).  Many communities in the affected area took emergency protective measures to protect critical facilities (Category B).  Floodwaters caused significant damages to roads and bridges, such as scouring of the road surface, undercutting of road beds, culvert collapses, and bridge washouts (Category C).  Pumping stations, and flood preventative measures throughout the affected area were damaged. (Category D). Some of the affected area also suffered damages to other public facilities, damaging equipment (Category E).  Water treatment facilities and associated infrastructure were impacted due to power loss (Category F).  State parks, County, and municipal parks were impacted (Category G).

The impact to Decatur County and Pottawattamie County is approximately $500,000 above the amount presented in this request. Both counties presented damages that increased the reported damages for culvert collapses and bridge washouts (Category C). It was determined at the time of this request by both FEMA and the State of Iowa that the additional damages would not be captured for the current assessment, but will be reviewed during the project worksheet writing process.

Below is a summary of estimated Public Assistance eligible damages in the nine counties for which I am requesting Federal assistance:

Category

Estimated $

A (Debris Removal)

570,756

B (Emergency Protective Measures)

149,030

C (Roads & Bridges)

2,857,398

D (Water Control Facilities)

450,000

E (Buildings & Equipment)

20,250

F (Utilities)

1,533,822

G (Parks, Rec Facilities, Other)

15,000

TOTAL

5,596,256

ROLE OF PRIOR HAZARD MITIGATION EFFORTS.

The State of Iowa has been proactive in hazard mitigation planning activities for many years.  The State’s planning process is driven by Section 322 of the Disaster Mitigation Act of 2000 (DMA 2000) and is synchronized through the coordination and integration of local hazard mitigation planning with interagency planning of the State Hazard Mitigation Team.  The State has an approved State Mitigation Plan through September 18, 2017.

Since 1993, the State of Iowa has been proactive in mitigating the affects flooding poses to private and public property in the affected area.  The most significant mitigation effort includes the acquisition of flood-prone properties which were converted into permanent open space in the floodplain. It is estimated that 120 properties acquired through nine completed projects in the affected Counties may have been damaged as a result of this most recent flooding.  It is estimated that these activities resulted in over $1.8 million in avoided damages in this most recent event.

In partnership with Rural Electrical Cooperatives, the State of Iowa has retrofitted 31.8 miles of electrical lines in the affected areas to withstand high winds.  According to reports from Rural Electrical Cooperatives, the power lines that were mitigated sustained no damages from this event.

 

PREVIOUS DISASTER EVENTS.

Currently, the State of Iowa has 14 open Presidentially-declared disasters for Public Assistance.  All nine of the counties for which I am requesting a declaration are included in at least one of these Presidentially-declared disasters.  The latest round of damage only serves to cause additional stress to these counties. 

In the year prior to this event, I issued 16 State of Iowa Disaster Emergency proclamations, all related to severe storms, flooding, and tornados between May 19, 2013 and June 28, 2013.  Presidential Disaster Declarations DR-4119, DR-4126 and DR-4135.

CURRENT DISASTER EVENTS.

The State of Iowa has experienced additional disaster events since the conclusion of the Joint Federal, State, and local Public Assistance Preliminary Damage Assessments. I have issued State of Iowa Disaster Emergency proclamations related to severe storms and flooding for 29 counties. I determined that the severity of the damage in 24 of these 29 counties is so great that Joint Federal, State, and local Public Assistance Preliminary Damage Assessments were required. On June 20, 2014, the State of Iowa first requested a Joint Federal, State, and local Public Assistance Preliminary Damage Assessment for 14 of the most severely impacted Counties. The State of Iowa requested assessments for an additional 10 counties on June 24, 2014. These assessments commenced on June 26, and are scheduled to conclude on July 3.

                There is a subsequent event related to severe storms and flooding resulting in additional damages throughout the State of Iowa. I have issued five State of Iowa Disaster Emergency Proclamations for severe storms and flooding for the event beginning June 26, 2014.

ASSISTANCE REQUESTED AND CERTIFICATIONS GIVEN.

Preliminary estimates of the types and amount of assistance needed under the Stafford Act are tabulated in the enclosures, particularly, Enclosure B1.  The Governor’s Certification is included in Enclosure B2. 

I certify that for this major disaster, the State and local governments will assume all applicable non-Federal share of costs required by the Stafford Act.  The total non-Federal expenditures for the period starting June 3, 2014 through June 4, 2014 are expected to exceed $4.5 million.

I request direct Federal assistance for work and services to save lives and protect property to include debris removal, emergency protective measures, long-term housing/sheltering.  Because of the continuing nature of the flooding, it is still too early to determine the exact needs.  Further, I request Hazard Mitigation “Statewide”.

In accordance with 44 CFR§ 206.208, the State of Iowa agrees that with respect to direct Federal assistance, it will do the following:

  1. Provide without cost to the United States all lands, easements and rights-of-ways necessary to accomplish the approved work;
  2. Hold and save the United States free from damages due to the requested work, and shall indemnify the Federal Government against any claims arising from such work;
  3. Provide reimbursement to FEMA for the non-Federal share of the cost of such work in accordance with the provisions of the FEMA-State Agreement; and
  4. Assist the performing Federal agency in all support and local jurisdictional matters.

 

Pursuant to Sections 403 and 407 of the Stafford Act, 42 U.S.C. § 5170b, 5173, the State agrees to indemnify and hold harmless the United States of America for any claims arising from the removal of debris or wreckage for this disaster.  The State agrees that debris removal from public and private property will not occur until the landowner signs an unconditional authorization for the removal of debris.

I hereby designate Patrick J. Hall as the State Coordinating Officer for this request.  He will work with the Federal Emergency Management Agency and may provide further information or justification on my behalf.

 

                                                                                                Sincerely,

                                                                                               

                                                                                               

                                                                                                Terry E. Branstad                                                                              Governor, State of Iowa

 

Enclosures

OMB No. 1660-0009/FEMA Form 010-0-13

A: Individual Assistance

B: Public Assistance

ENCLOSURE B1 TO MAJOR DISASTER REQUEST

Estimated Requirements for Public Assistance

Under the Stafford Act

CATEGORY

Note:  Estimates reflect total eligible costs before any cost sharing.

County (9)

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

Total

Adams

$8,330.00

$59,751.00

$250.00

$44,285.00

$112,616.00

Clarke

 

$43,000.00

 

 

$43,000.00

Decatur

$24,640.00

$17,686.00

$1,003,660.00

 

$19,709.00

$1,065,695.00

Mills

$20,732.00

$67,500.00

 

 

$88,232.00

Montgomery

$123,155.00

$2,344.00

$545,788.00

 

$8,750.00

$680,037.00

Pottawattamie

$371,499.00

$129,000.00

$783,400.00

$450,000.00

$20,000.00

$1,414,223.00

$15,000

$3,183,122.00

Ringgold

 

$300,000.00

 

$13,905.00

$313,905.00

Taylor

$11,200.00

$20,653.00

 

$25,537.00

$57,390.00

Wayne

$11,200.00

$33,646.00

 

$7,213.00

$52,059.00

TOTALS

$570,756.00

$149,030.00

$2,857,398.00

$450,000.00

$20,250.00

$1,533,622.00

$15,000.00

$5,596,056.00

ENCLOSURE B2 TO MAJOR DISASTER REQUEST

Governor’s Certification

I certify that for this current disaster, State and local government expenditures and obligations will include the non-Federal share and costs required by the Stafford Act.  As stated in my basic letter, and based on information available at this time, tabulation of these estimated expenditures and obligations are as follows:

CATEGORY OF ASSISTANCE

AMOUNT

Individual Assistance:

STATE

LOCAL

  “Other Assistance” under the Individual and Households Program

$0

$0

  Other (specify)

 

Total:

$0

$0

 

Public Assistance:

 

  Category A – Debris Removal

$57,075.60

$85,613.40

  Category B – Emergency Protective Measures

$14,903.00

$22,354.50

  Category C – Roads and Bridges

$285,739.80

$428,609.70

  Category D – Water Control Facilities

$45,000.00

$67,500.00

  Category E – Buildings and Equipment

$2,025.00

$3,037.50

  Category F – Utilities

$153,362.20

$230,043.30

  Category G – Other (Parks, Recreational Facilities, etc.)

$1,500.00

$2,250.00

Total:

$559,605.60

$839,408.40

Grand Total:

$559,605.60

$839,408.40

 

###

For more information please visit www.IowaFloodCentral.Tumblr.com or www.homelandsecurity.iowa.gov.

The Iowa Department of Revenue (IDR) has granted an extension to file the quarterly Iowa sales/use tax and withholding returns for the period ending June 30, 2014, to taxpayers affected by flooding in the counties for which Gov. Terry E. Branstad has issued a proclamation of disaster emergency.

A current list of counties for which an extension of time has been granted can be found on the IDR website at www.iowa.gov/tax. Taxpayers located in one of the listed counties can file those returns by September 30, 2014 without penalty or interest.

When filing a return on extension for the period ending June 30, 2014, taxpayers should:

* Select the correct period for the return being filed through IDR’s eFile & Pay system.
 
 -Choose Apr 1 - June 30, 2014, for the June quarterly return.
 -Choose July 1 - Sep 30, 2014, for the September quarterly return.
 -File separate returns for June and September; do not combine on one return.

* IDR’s eFile & Pay system will automatically calculate penalty and interest if the June return is filed after July 31, 2014. IF YOU ARE LOCATED IN ONE OF THE COUNTIES LISTED, and file no later than September 30, disregard the penalty and interest calculated for the June 2014 quarter and pay only the tax due.

Courtney Kay-Decker, Director of the Iowa Department of Revenue, is authorized by law to extend the period of time for filing tax returns and to suspend any penalty or interest associated with those returns for taxpayers whose principal residence or business is located in a disaster area declared by the Governor.

For more information, please contact the Iowa Department of Revenue at idr@iowa.gov or call 515-281-3114 or 1-800-367-3388 (Iowa, Omaha, Rock Island, Moline), 8 a.m. - 4:15 p.m. CT.